How to use the traceroute command to troubleshoot network issues on Ubuntu?

by georgiana.senger , in category: Networking & Wireless , a year ago

How to use the traceroute command to troubleshoot network issues on Ubuntu?

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by tina , a year ago

@georgiana.senger 

The traceroute command is a useful tool for troubleshooting network issues on Ubuntu, as it allows you to trace the route that packets take from your computer to a destination host. Here are the steps to use the traceroute command on Ubuntu:

  1. Open a terminal window on your Ubuntu system.
  2. Type traceroute followed by the IP address or domain name of the destination host. For example, if you want to trace the route to Google's DNS server at IP address 8.8.8.8, you would type traceroute 8.8.8.8.
  3. Press Enter to run the command. The output will display the route that packets take from your computer to the destination host, along with information about the IP addresses of the routers that the packets pass through.
  4. Look for any problems in the output, such as high latency or packet loss. These issues can indicate network congestion or connectivity problems.
  5. If you encounter any issues, you can try running the traceroute command with the -I option to use ICMP packets instead of UDP packets. This can help you diagnose issues with specific types of traffic.
  6. You can also try running the traceroute command with the -T option to use TCP packets instead of UDP packets. This can help you diagnose issues with TCP connections.
  7. If you need more detailed information about the route that packets take, you can use the mtr command instead of traceroute. The mtr command provides real-time statistics about the latency and packet loss of each hop along the route, which can help you pinpoint the source of network issues more quickly.


Overall, the traceroute command is a useful tool for troubleshooting network issues on Ubuntu, and can help you identify problems with network connectivity, latency, and packet loss.

by clyde_reichert , 20 days ago

@georgiana.senger 

This guide provides an overview of how to use the traceroute command to troubleshoot network issues on Ubuntu. The traceroute tool is valuable for understanding the path that packets take from your source device to a designated destination, revealing details about the intermediate routers and potential network problems along the way.


Here's a breakdown of the steps involved in using traceroute effectively on Ubuntu:

  1. Open a Terminal: Launch a terminal window on your Ubuntu system. This is where you will enter and execute the traceroute command.
  2. Execute the Traceroute Command: Input traceroute followed by the destination IP address or domain name. For instance, to trace the route to a specific website like google.com, you would type traceroute google.com and hit Enter.
  3. Review the Output: Once the command is executed, the terminal will display a list of the hops (or routers) that the packets traverse to reach the destination. Take note of the round-trip times (latency) and any indications of timeouts or packet loss at specific hops.
  4. Diagnose Network Problems: Analyze the output for potential issues like high latency, timeouts, or unreachable hosts. These anomalies can help identify network congestion, routing problems, or firewall issues.
  5. Exploring Further Options: Consider using the -I option with traceroute to send ICMP (ping) packets, which might provide additional insights into specific network problems. Utilize the -T option to send TCP packets instead of the default UDP packets, aiding in diagnosing TCP-related issues. For more comprehensive data and ongoing network analysis, use the mtr command, which combines features of traceroute and ping to assess network performance continuously.


By following these steps and exploring the capabilities of the traceroute command on Ubuntu, you can effectively troubleshoot network issues, pinpoint bottlenecks, and facilitate smoother connectivity across your networking environment.